Pirated Maps | Shanghai Gets Tough

Shanghai is getting tough on the piracy of maps.

Mapping authorities in the city announced yesterday they will provide cash rewards of up to 100,000 yuan (US$12,346) to those who provide “valuable clues” to help ferret out the producers and vendors of pirated maps.
They also said they will begin selling genuine maps at major downtown locations using automatic vending machines.
“Pirated maps not only disturb legal business, but also mislead buyers,” Lu Weijun, a spokesperson for the Shanghai Institute of Surveying and Mapping, said yesterday.
He said the high rewards will help collect information about who is printing pirated maps and increase public awareness about the importance of intellectual property rights.
It’s not difficult to find pirated maps for sale at long-distance bus stations, ports, scenic spots and book stalls where people, particularly those from outlying places, often visit, officials said.
According to officials at the institute, at least 1 million pirated maps are sold in the city every year, accounting for one-third of all maps sold in Shanghai, which has greatly impacted the map publishing business.

I guess when IP infringements start to hurt locally, it may have a positive effect globally.
What product is next?

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2 Responses to “Pirated Maps | Shanghai Gets Tough”

  1. Gordon
    August 18th, 2005 06:47
    1

    Ooohhhh..suuure. They don’t like it when people pirate their stuff, but it’s okay to do it to other countries.

    Now I get it…

  2. shawn
    August 19th, 2005 02:32
    2

    Whoa, that’s a nice reward! Are you making maps, hmmm…

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